Image of chalkboard with counting strikes grouped by fives

Repetition Is the Key

More specifically, repetition trying things yourself. It’s easy to get caught up in doing endless tutorials if your a beginner, but I’ve found that unless you’ve put away the book or video and tried to recreate what the tutorial did without the instructors guidance, then you may not really understand the logic behind many of the things that were done. This is how many people can go through a ton of tutorials yet still feel like they can’t program anything.

It’s probably because you never faced that blank text editor and tried to build something yourself. Many people get stuck here and don’t apply to jobs because they feel like they can’t program. Well if you really don’t want to just go for it, then the only way to solve that is to apply what you’ve learned yourself and get some repetition under your belt. Do what you would do at a job, yourself. Build things. Soon enough like John Sonmez formerly of Simple Programmer said, things will start to “click”. If you keep doing it, eventually you’ll start to just “get it”.

This goes along with a concept I read in the book Mastery by Robert Greene. It’s a great book I’ll do a review on. But essentially one of the points he made in it was that our brains are very nimble. We as humans adapt, learn, and re-wire very quickly. When we try to take shortcuts this goes against our nature. Time is our friend when learning new skills. When we expose our brains repetitiously to concepts, this allows our brain to make the connections and adapt. When we try to skip the hard part of doing it, it ends up taking longer to learn because we are working against how our brains work.

In other words, do it. Yourself.

Soon creativity will start to flow and you’ll come up with your own ideas of apps to make. Then build those applications. Start with simple ones. You’ll be amazed how quickly you learn.

Love and Peace,

Danielle

MongoDB vs MySQL thumbnail image

MongoDB vs. MySQL

First of all I love the flexibility you have with a non-relational database, in terms of being able to have a varying data set. Though it’s great to be able to have a schema for the data so it can still have a predictable structure. With MySQL, the data sets are tabular which is great for comparing, but with MongoDB the data sets are “collections” which are basically syntactically like JavaScript objects, actually BSON (Binary JSON), which of course is a plus! I’m already familiar with SQL commands so I was able to connect the MongoDB CRUD concepts with MySQL, though the commands are different and more like JavaScript as well. It’s fun comparing and contrasting. I’ll keep experimenting.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Node.js logo

Post Requests with Express

I’ve been looking forward to getting to doing manual Post Routes and Requests for some time now. It’s interesting to see things like variables and arrays being passed around as objects on the server-side via Express on Node.js. And parsing the req.body into a JavaScript object to capture and show the request data. I’m also experimenting with Reddit Route Parameters by duplicating subreddit route params, defining a pattern in a route, and making a dynamic webpage with those parameters.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

ES6

ES6

I was a fan of For Loops and the way they make everything explicit in terms of what exactly it’s doing, and how you can get to exact solutions to specific problems. But I’ve been studying ES6 and that’s when forEach came along. I’ve been converted. This method on the array prototype is helping me get acquainted with abstraction. And after working with it for a bit I’m actually starting to like it. I’m also finding the map and filter methods, const/let and arrow functions very helpful as well. This is great preparation for React.js.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

DeeDee of Dexters Laboratory typing

Better Typing, Better Programming

One thing that I don’t see mentioned much if at all, is improving your typing ability to improve as a programmer. When I first started learning programming I typed while looking at the keyboard. And with others quite often I would see those who tend to be beginners to programming, staring at the keyboard, pressing one key at a time. Everyone does have to start somewhere. But this really slows things down and puts a lot of stress on your neck. I’ve learned that it really speeds things up, and it’s much healthier to learn to type without having to look.

I’ve worked on my typing accuracy and speed a little bit everyday and I wouldn’t even recognize myself typing the way I used anymore. It’s definitely been instrumental in letting creativity flow and focusing on the programming, instead of where the next key is on the keyboard. A great tool to use that’s inexpensive and simple is Type Fu. As of the time of this writing it’s 9.99 USD on the Mac App Store (OS X) and 4.99 USD on the Chrome Web Store (Windows, OS X, Linux, Chrome OS). I am not affiliated with them but it has helped me tremendously. And there are also lots of free resources online.

And if you’re struggling with some of the things I mentioned, I encourage you to spend a little time everyday on your typing. It doesn’t have to be a big thing. Just 10-15 minutes a day can be very effective. But it will make things so much easier for you.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Template Engines - EJS and Node.js video thumbnail

Template Engines – EJS and Node.js

(video re-post)

 

Video transcript:

Love & Peace! What’s up y’all it’s Danielle, we’re talking about tech, coding, coding tutorials, vlogging, blogging, and self-development books so make sure you Subscribe and Like. And today’s topic is… Template Engines. So I’ve been working with template engines on the backend with Node.js and JavaScript of course. And I’ve come to find I’m seeing a lot of similarities between this and PHP. I was working with PHP earlier this year, and making dynamic web apps using things like header files, and footer files and things like that. Seeing how it all comes together with minimal repeated code, which is obviously infinitely easier to maintain. So now I’m seeing similarities between that and template engines on the backend with JavaScript and Node.js. And you know, now that I think about it they’re both server-side languages. PHP being a server-side language, and JavaScript with Node.js, it has those server-side capabilities. So I’m definitely making the connections and seeing the similarities between the two. So with JavaScript basically doing those same things, plus with JavaScript it’s able to do it with basically good old, client-side, vanilla JavaScript. So that’s awesome, and that’s it for now. So again Subscribe, Like, you know get more tech, programming tutorials, vlogs, blogs, self-development books and that’s it for now. Talk to you later, love and peace.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

JSLint comic

Debugging With a Linter

So I’m getting into debugging and I’ve come across tools called linters. It’s proving to be a great way to save time, catch JavaScript errors and prevent bugs.  And the one by Douglas Crockford called JSLint, is a perfect extension of his personality. Very straight-forward, and raises the bar. You can try it here. And if you want to try a less strict alternative, give JSHint a try.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Tesla APIs and The Boring Company video thumbnail

Tesla APIs and “The Boring Company”

(video re-posted)

 

Video transcript:

What’s up it’s Danielle talking about tech, coding, doing vlogs, reading and reviewing self development books, so subscribe to the channel. But what I want to talk about right now, I just found out Tesla cars have APIs. I might be late but I just found this out 🙂 Tesla cars have APIs and let me tell you this is one of the flyest things I ever heard. Let me just look at this… This Internet of Things (IoT) space is no joke. So it says just by using the API you can remotely start and stop charging, flash the lights, honk the horn, check its charge level, and you can even set it at a certain time, like for example when you wake up, to check the temperature outside and then it then it will set the temperature inside the car to whatever you want. And another thing. While we’re on the subject of Elon Musk companies, another thing is the double entendre of the name “The Boring Company.” At first I thought he was being sarcastic, you know, with that name until I remembered that the company was building hyper-speed transportation, in tunnels. So boring is another word for digging. “Boring” tunnels. Get it? yeah lol… So they weren’t being sarcastic with “The Boring Company.” That’s actually quite clever. So all this space age transportation (The Boring Company, Tesla, SpaceX), I’m just trying to keep up. So that’s the vlog for now. Subscribe to the channel, get more tech, coding tutorials, vlogs, self-development, subscribe, like. Talk to you later, bye.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

JavaScript Functions Are Objects

(video re-posted)

 

Video transcript:

What’s up it’s Danielle, I’m hanging out in the library. I like to get a good book from time to time but today’s topic, vlog, blog, is Functions Are Objects. Functions are objects? I just found this out so I’m like wait a minute, I feel like JavaScript lied to me lol because all this time… But I should be more specific. In JavaScript, Functions are First-Class Objects. So I’m gonna have a good time, I’m gonna play around with this. And this should be the key with Functional Programming. You know, passing around functions to functions and really kind of playing with it, sort of like a set of Legos. And this should be key to unlocking JavaScript’s potential.

 

So right now I’m working with IIFE’s (Immediately-Invoked Function Expressions), the ‘this’ keyword, Closures, Hoisting, call(), apply(), bind(), of course Object-Oriented Programming, the ‘new’ keyword and Prototypal Inheritance. And I’m also gaining an understanding of Function Constructors. And while I’m doing that, I’m really kind of studying all these things in the Underscore.js library. It’s actually pretty good for studying Functional Programming. They comment everything, and everything’s really well explained. So if you haven’t seen it check it out. And that’s today’s video, that’s it for today. Again Subscribe, Like, you get plenty of tech, vlogs, self-development, reviewing and reading books. Check it out, stay tune, talk to you later.

P.S. It’s interesting the clever ways a lot of these concepts are used in the Underscore.js library.

 

Love & Peace,

Danielle