Image of chalkboard with counting strikes grouped by fives

Repetition Is the Key

More specifically, repetition trying things yourself. It’s easy to get caught up in doing endless tutorials if your a beginner, but I’ve found that unless you’ve put away the book or video and tried to recreate what the tutorial did without the instructors guidance, then you may not really understand the logic behind many of the things that were done. This is how many people can go through a ton of tutorials yet still feel like they can’t program anything.

It’s probably because you never faced that blank text editor and tried to build something yourself. Many people get stuck here and don’t apply to jobs because they feel like they can’t program. Well if you really don’t want to just go for it, then the only way to solve that is to apply what you’ve learned yourself and get some repetition under your belt. Do what you would do at a job, yourself. Build things. Soon enough like John Sonmez formerly of Simple Programmer said, things will start to “click”. If you keep doing it, eventually you’ll start to just “get it”.

This goes along with a concept I read in the book Mastery by Robert Greene. It’s a great book I’ll do a review on. But essentially one of the points he made in it was that our brains are very nimble. We as humans adapt, learn, and re-wire very quickly. When we try to take shortcuts this goes against our nature. Time is our friend when learning new skills. When we expose our brains repetitiously to concepts, this allows our brain to make the connections and adapt. When we try to skip the hard part of doing it, it ends up taking longer to learn because we are working against how our brains work.

In other words, do it. Yourself.

Soon creativity will start to flow and you’ll come up with your own ideas of apps to make. Then build those applications. Start with simple ones. You’ll be amazed how quickly you learn.

Love and Peace,

Danielle

Image of the names of a lot of programming languages

Don’t Learn a Million Programming Languages

Learn one, and understand the logic. At least at first.

When I first started learning programming I used to think that learning the syntax of a couple programming languages was important. Namely JavaScript and PHP. But I came to find that I knew the syntax, but I still couldn’t program. I couldn’t make anything myself. I came to realize that learning syntax is the simple part.

In your first language build things yourself. Building applications yourself will cement the logic in your mind. Start with simple apps.

After you understand the basics of the logic in your first programming language, THEN learn another language if you really want to. Though I would recommend sticking with one for a while. Then you’re really more or less just learning the syntax of the language because you already understand the logic in most programming languages. That is if you picked a common language, not an obscure one that’s different from most.

I’ve also found that sticking to one or a few things is a great confidence boost when learning whole new concepts. It gives you a chance to gain some type of mastery over things and eventually, you start to see over the top of that learning curve.

Love & Peace,

Danielle