Models of the World video thumbnail

Models of the World

 

I’m reading the book JavaScript and JQuery by Jon Duckett, and it has given me a new perspective on programs and how they interact with data. In this vlog I expound on that.

Video transcript:

Hey! So I wanted to make a video about this book I’m looking at called JavaScript and JQuery. It’s kind of made a shift in the way I look at programming and how programs interact with computers. I had made some things, I’ve made some objects, functions, put some data in there, and the programs done some things but, the way that it explains it in this book, I think it would be beneficial to everybody. So first of all this is the book I’m looking at, JavaScript and JQuery. So firstly it says computers create models of the world using data. And I like this because it makes you think of programs as a representation of the world as opposed to, you know, a bunch of lines of code lol… And here it shows you a hotel and some cars and it goes on to say, you can think of objects as the hotel, the people, the cars. And when you look at events, this is when we interact with those objects and cause something to happen. Like it says here an event at the hotel would be a reservation being made, or a reservation being cancelled. With the car, if the driver brakes it slows down, accelerate, it speeds up. And it goes on to say with methods, these in a way are the things that we DO with the objects in the world. Like it had a method here for, there’s a method make booking for… increases the value of make bookings property. Cancel booking decreases value of bookings property. With the cars it said there’s a method change speed where it increases or decreases the value of current speed property. So I just thought it was a really interesting way to look at programs as not just lines of code that are making a computer or an application do something. But it’s like, a representation of the world, and the things or the objects IN the world and how we interact with them.

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Love & Peace,

Danielle

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MongoDB vs. MySQL

First of all I love the flexibility you have with a non-relational database, in terms of being able to have a varying data set. Though it’s great to be able to have a schema for the data so it can still have a predictable structure. With MySQL, the data sets are tabular which is great for comparing, but with MongoDB the data sets are “collections” which are basically syntactically like JavaScript objects, actually BSON (Binary JSON), which of course is a plus! I’m already familiar with SQL commands so I was able to connect the MongoDB CRUD concepts with MySQL, though the commands are different and more like JavaScript as well. It’s fun comparing and contrasting. I’ll keep experimenting.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Node.js logo

Post Requests with Express

I’ve been looking forward to getting to doing manual Post Routes and Requests for some time now. It’s interesting to see things like variables and arrays being passed around as objects on the server-side via Express on Node.js. And parsing the req.body into a JavaScript object to capture and show the request data. I’m also experimenting with Reddit Route Parameters by duplicating subreddit route params, defining a pattern in a route, and making a dynamic webpage with those parameters.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

ES6

ES6

I was a fan of For Loops and the way they make everything explicit in terms of what exactly it’s doing, and how you can get to exact solutions to specific problems. But I’ve been studying ES6 and that’s when forEach came along. I’ve been converted. This method on the array prototype is helping me get acquainted with abstraction. And after working with it for a bit I’m actually starting to like it. I’m also finding the map and filter methods, const/let and arrow functions very helpful as well. This is great preparation for React.js.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Template Engines - EJS and Node.js video thumbnail

Template Engines – EJS and Node.js

(video re-post)

 

Video transcript:

Love & Peace! What’s up y’all it’s Danielle, we’re talking about tech, coding, coding tutorials, vlogging, blogging, and self-development books so make sure you Subscribe and Like. And today’s topic is… Template Engines. So I’ve been working with template engines on the backend with Node.js and JavaScript of course. And I’ve come to find I’m seeing a lot of similarities between this and PHP. I was working with PHP earlier this year, and making dynamic web apps using things like header files, and footer files and things like that. Seeing how it all comes together with minimal repeated code, which is obviously infinitely easier to maintain. So now I’m seeing similarities between that and template engines on the backend with JavaScript and Node.js. And you know, now that I think about it they’re both server-side languages. PHP being a server-side language, and JavaScript with Node.js, it has those server-side capabilities. So I’m definitely making the connections and seeing the similarities between the two. So with JavaScript basically doing those same things, plus with JavaScript it’s able to do it with basically good old, client-side, vanilla JavaScript. So that’s awesome, and that’s it for now. So again Subscribe, Like, you know get more tech, programming tutorials, vlogs, blogs, self-development books and that’s it for now. Talk to you later, love and peace.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

JSLint comic

Debugging With a Linter

So I’m getting into debugging and I’ve come across tools called linters. It’s proving to be a great way to save time, catch JavaScript errors and prevent bugs.  And the one by Douglas Crockford called JSLint, is a perfect extension of his personality. Very straight-forward, and raises the bar. You can try it here. And if you want to try a less strict alternative, give JSHint a try.

Love & Peace,

Danielle