JSLint comic

Debugging With a Linter

So I’m getting into debugging and I’ve come across tools called linters. It’s proving to be a great way to save time, catch JavaScript errors and prevent bugs.  And the one by Douglas Crockford called JSLint, is a perfect extension of his personality. Very straight-forward, and raises the bar. You can try it here. And if you want to try a less strict alternative, give JSHint a try.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Tesla APIs and The Boring Company video thumbnail

Tesla APIs and “The Boring Company”

(video re-posted)

 

Video transcript:

What’s up it’s Danielle talking about tech, coding, doing vlogs, reading and reviewing self development books, so subscribe to the channel. But what I want to talk about right now, I just found out Tesla cars have APIs. I might be late but I just found this out 🙂 Tesla cars have APIs and let me tell you this is one of the flyest things I ever heard. Let me just look at this… This Internet of Things (IoT) space is no joke. So it says just by using the API you can remotely start and stop charging, flash the lights, honk the horn, check its charge level, and you can even set it at a certain time, like for example when you wake up, to check the temperature outside and then it then it will set the temperature inside the car to whatever you want. And another thing. While we’re on the subject of Elon Musk companies, another thing is the double entendre of the name “The Boring Company.” At first I thought he was being sarcastic, you know, with that name until I remembered that the company was building hyper-speed transportation, in tunnels. So boring is another word for digging. “Boring” tunnels. Get it? yeah lol… So they weren’t being sarcastic with “The Boring Company.” That’s actually quite clever. So all this space age transportation (The Boring Company, Tesla, SpaceX), I’m just trying to keep up. So that’s the vlog for now. Subscribe to the channel, get more tech, coding tutorials, vlogs, self-development, subscribe, like. Talk to you later, bye.

Love & Peace,

Danielle

JavaScript Functions Are Objects

(video re-posted)

 

Video transcript:

What’s up it’s Danielle, I’m hanging out in the library. I like to get a good book from time to time but today’s topic, vlog, blog, is Functions Are Objects. Functions are objects? I just found this out so I’m like wait a minute, I feel like JavaScript lied to me lol because all this time… But I should be more specific. In JavaScript, Functions are First-Class Objects. So I’m gonna have a good time, I’m gonna play around with this. And this should be the key with Functional Programming. You know, passing around functions to functions and really kind of playing with it, sort of like a set of Legos. And this should be key to unlocking JavaScript’s potential.

 

So right now I’m working with IIFE’s (Immediately-Invoked Function Expressions), the ‘this’ keyword, Closures, Hoisting, call(), apply(), bind(), of course Object-Oriented Programming, the ‘new’ keyword and Prototypal Inheritance. And I’m also gaining an understanding of Function Constructors. And while I’m doing that, I’m really kind of studying all these things in the Underscore.js library. It’s actually pretty good for studying Functional Programming. They comment everything, and everything’s really well explained. So if you haven’t seen it check it out. And that’s today’s video, that’s it for today. Again Subscribe, Like, you get plenty of tech, vlogs, self-development, reviewing and reading books. Check it out, stay tune, talk to you later.

P.S. It’s interesting the clever ways a lot of these concepts are used in the Underscore.js library.

 

Love & Peace,

Danielle

Button with up and down arrows

Up, Down, In-Between?

Many people get the DOM (Document Object Model) Events keypress, keydown and keyup confused, I was one of them.

At a surface level it may appear they do basically the same thing, but let’s look a little closer…

Keypress events can seem the same as keydown, but keydown is triggered as soon as a user presses a key on a keyboard. A keypress event is triggered for each character that’s typed.

For example, modifier keys like Shift, that don’t actually type a character when pressed, trigger keydown events. But because it never types a character, it never triggers a keypress event.

The keyup event is caused when the user releases a key. The element that has the focus, or often the cursor, is where the event is sent.

Love & Peace,

Danielle